OpenSeaMap-dev:Harbour-DB/WPI Attribute

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Pub. 150, Liste der 31 WPI-Attribute (Version 2019-10)

1. INDEX NUMBER

Each port and place listed in the text of this publication is numbered consecutively. Only the approved index number and name will appear in this list. Ports and places can be located by referring to the alphabetical index to find the index number. In cases where there is an alter- nate and/or more familiar name, that name will have the same index number. The page number will not be listed.

Aufsteigender Index. Häfen mit mehreren Namen haben die selbe Indexnummer.

2. PORTS

Ports are grouped according to country and locality, and are listed in geographic sequence as shown on the chartlets in the fore part of the volume, following, in general, the coastal trend. The listing of ports in off-lying islands normally interrupts the coastal listing at some convenient place abreast of the island. River ports are listed toward the head of navigation, alternating from bank to bank, except where local considerations make other arrangements more practicable. In general, ports are listed under the names approved by the U.S. Board on Geographic Names. Alternate or more familiar names, however, are also included in the index, under the same index number.

Namen sind geografisch geordnet, entlang der Küsten. Häfen mit mehreren Namen haben dieselbe Indexnummer.

3. LATITUDE AND LONGITUDE

The position of each port, expressed in degrees and minutes, is generally obtained from the best-scale chart available.

Position auf 1' genau = 1 nm

4. SAILING DIRECTIONS

The publication number of the National Geospatial-Intelligence Agency Sailing Directions, describing the port or area in which the port is located, is normally given. For ports in other areas, however, other publications are shown under the following abbreviations: CP – United States Coast Pilot - published by the National Ocean Service, NOAA, Department of Commerce (for United States continental and territorial ports). BA – Admiralty Sailing Directions - published by the United Kingdom Hydrographic Office (for Black Sea and Sea of Azov ports).

5. CHARTS

The number of the best-scale chart issued by the National Geospatial-Intelligence Agency is listed with no prefix.

6. HARBOR SIZE

The classification of harbor size is based on several applicable factors, including area, facilities, and wharf space. It is not based on area alone or on any other single factor.

L = large
M = medium
S = small
V = very small

7. TYPE HARBOR

The term “harbor” is used for the principal water area of the port. Harbors are classified as being coastal natural, coastal breakwater, open roadstead, etc. Typical harbor types are illustrated in the forepart of this volume.

      = Unknown
CB = Coastal Breakwater
CN = Coastal Natural
CT = Coastal Tide Gate
LC = Lake or Canal
OR = Open Roadstead
RB = River Basin
RN = River Natural
RT = River Tide Gate
TH = Typhoon Harbor

8. SHELTERED AFFORDED

The shelter afforded from wind, sea, and swell, refers to the area where normal port operations are conducted, usually the wharf area. Shelter afforded the anchorage area is given for ports where cargo is handled by lighters.

E = Excellent / ausgezeichnet
G = Good / gut
F = Fair / ausreichend
P = Poor / schlecht
N = None / kein
      Unknown / unbekannt

Gut wäre eine Angabe über den Schutz vor Windrichtungen (N, NE, E, SE, S, SW, W, NW)
Winddiagramm

9. ENTRANCE RESTRICTIONS

Natural factors restricting the entrance of vessels, such as ice, heavy swell, etc., are listed.

10. OVERHEAD LIMITATIONS

This entry is shown only to indicate that bridge and overhead power cables exist. It is advisable to refer to the chart for particulars.

11. DEPTHS

Depth information is generalized into 5-foot units, with the equivalents in meters, for the main channel, the main anchorage, and the principal cargo pier and/or oil terminal. Depths refer to chart datum. Depths are given in increments of 5 feet (1.5 meters) in order to lessen the number of changes when a small change in depth occurs.

Depth Code Feet Meters
A 76ft - OVER 23.2m - OVER
B 71ft - 75ft 21.6m - 22.9m
C 66ft - 75ft 20.1m - 21.3m
D 61ft - 65ft 18.6m - 19.8m
E 56ft - 60ft 17.1m - 18.2m
F 51ft - 55ft 15.5m - 16m
G 46ft - 50ft 14m - 15.2m
H 41ft - 45ft 12.5m - 13.7m
J 36ft - 40ft 11m - 12.2m
K 31ft - 35ft 9.4m - 10m
L 26ft - 30ft 7.1m - 9.1m
M 21ft - 25ft 6.4m - 7.6m
N 16ft - 20ft 4.9m - 6.1m
O 11ft - 15ft 3.4m - 4.6m
P 6ft - 10ft 1.8m - 3m
Q 0ft - 5ft 0m - 1.5m
Unknown Unknown

A depth of 31 feet (9.5 meters) would use letter “K,” a depth of 36 feet (11.0 meters) would use “J,” etc.
The letter “K” means a least depth of 31 feet (9.5 meters) or greater, but not as great as 36 feet (11.0 meters).

Fehler
falsch: C 66ft - 75ft 20.1m - 21.3m
richtig: C 66ft - 70ft 20.1m - 21.3m (Fehler ist gemeldet...)

Further guidance on depths is, as follows:

a. CHANNEL (controlling)

The controlling depth of the principal or deepest channel at chart datum is given. The channel selected should lead up to the anchorage if within the harbor or to the wharf/pier. If the channel depth decreases from the anchorage to the wharf/pier and cargo can be worked at the anchorage, then the depth leading to the anchorage is taken. Large ports may have sub-ports (smaller) which have their own number and entry in the World Port Index. The controlling depth of the channel should refer to a smaller channel (if present) lead- ing from the main channel into the sub-port facilities and anchorages. Note.—The depth of small shoals is not a controlling depth unless it limits the passage of ves- sels. For example, if a channel is charted as having a depth of 39 feet (11.9 meters), but there are small shoals noted or charted with depths of 30 feet (9.1 meters), then the controlling depth is still 39 feet (11.9 meters) unless a ship with a draft of 39 feet (11.9 meters) cannot pass around the shoals and navigate the channel safely.

b. ANCHORAGE

The depth in the anchorage is the least depth in the best or principal anchorage. The depth listed reflects a general depth in the anchorage rather than an isolated shoal spot. A shoal which does not necessarily obstruct the anchorage is not considered for the least depth if the rest of the anchorage is safe and practicable.

c. CARGO PIER/WHARF

The greatest depth at chart datum alongside the respective wharf/pier is given. If there is more than one wharf/pier, then the one which has greatest usable depth is shown. For example, if there are three cargo/container piers with depths of 23 feet (7.0 meters), 33 feet (10.1 meters), and 43 feet (13.1 meters), then Code H, representing the deepest depth of 43 feet (13.1 meters), would be entered into the World Port Index.

d. OIL \ LNG TERMINAL

The greatest depth at chart datum will be shown. Note: an oil terminal is a facility designed to conduct the loading and/or off-loading of crude oil or refined petroleum products. The terminal can be associated with a port or can be a stand alone facility. Generally, the terminal is offshore and is connected to the shore facilities by a pipeline. The off- shore part may be an extended pier, SBM, buoy field, platform, or storage tanker. Many ports have piers and/or wharves that have facilities for refueling vessels. The oil terminal is distinguished by being specifically for oil transfer operations and nothing else (repairs alongside and cargo opera- tions not permitted). LNG terminals are normally located away from other port operations and operate under and expanded set of safety regulations.

12. TIDES

The mean range in meters is normally given for all ports outside of United States (U.S.) jurisdiction, but the mean rise is substituted if range data is not available. The distinction between range and rise can be disregarded without affecting the general utility of this publication. Note.—The mean range is given in feet for all US ports and ports under U.S. jurisdiction (Trust Territories, etc).

13. MAXIMUM SIZE VESSEL

L = ship of over 500 feet (152.4 meters) long may be accommodated.
M = ships less than 500 feet (152.4 meters) long may be accommodated.

14. GOOD HOLDING GROUND

This is indicated only where actual anchorage conditions have been reported.

15. TURNING AREA

An indication that a turning basin or other water area for turning vessels is available in the port.

16. FIRST PORT OF ENTRY

A port where a vessel may enter and clear foreign goods and person- nel through Customs and Immigration. For vessels arriving from overseas a quarantine clearance is required by the First Port of Entry.

17. U.S. REPRESENTATIVE

Indicates whether the United States maintains civilian/military rep- resentation in that port.

18. ETA (Estimated Time of Arrival) MESSAGE

Indicates whether an ETA message is required for that port.

19. PILOTAGE

The necessity or advisability of taking a pilot is given. In some cases, pilotage may be compulsory, although pilots are not actually stationed at the port in question and must be obtained elsewhere.

20. TUGS

Indicates whether tugs are available for docking or anchorage assistance.

21. COMMUNICATIONS

Indicates what types of communications are available in the port and/or nearby area.

22. LOAD/OFFLOAD

Refers to the area where normal port operations are conducted.

23. MEDICAL FACILITIES

An indication that there is some form of medical facilities in the port that will accommodate seamen.

24. GARBAGE DISPOSAL

Indicates whether garbage can be disposed of at the pier or by lighters at the anchorage or mooring.

25. DEGAUSSING

Indicates whether degaussing facilities are available.

26. DIRTY BALLAST

Pertains to a port that has sufficient facilities for receiving oily and/or chemically contaminated dirty ballast.

27. CRANES/LIFTS

Indicates whether there are cranes available and what type, and its lifting power in tons.

28. SERVICES

Indicates whether normal port services are available.

29. SUPPLIES

The availability of provisions, water, and fuel oil is listed. Fuel oil and diesel oil are listed separately, but in cases of original source information failing to distinguish between the two, both kinds are presumed to be available and are so listed.

30. REPAIRS

Repairs that can be made to ocean-going vessels are classified, as follows:

A = Major – Extensive overhauling and rebuilding in well equipped shipyards
B = Moderate – Extensive overhauling and rebuilding that does not require drydocking. Suitable dry-docking facilities are usually lacking or inadequate
C = Limited – Small repair work in independent machine shops or foundries
D = Emergency only
N = None
    = unknown

31. DRYDOCK/MARINE RAILWAY

The general size and type of the largest underwater repair facilities in the port are listed below. Code Drydock Marine Railways

S up to 656 feet 200 meters up to 200 tons
M 657 feet to 984 feet 201 to 300 meters 201 to 1,000 tons
L 985 feet and over 301 meters and over over 1,000 tons